Wholesome Marketing Ideas, Bite Size

Wholesome marketing ideas, bite size

Sunday, September 18, 2011

"Marketing" in the 20th century

I was playing around with the Google Ngram viewer to see how often the term “marketing” appears in books during the twentieth century.
Here are some of the charts I came up with. In the comments section, please feel free to share your thoughts on what you see in the charts, and if you’d like to suggest other graphs, I’ll do a follow-up post.

The term “marketing” appears to have made steady gains in popularity through the 20th century, but its biggest gains came in the first and last twenty years of the century. Any thoughts on the what the spike in about 1905 might be?



Comparing marketing with other business school disciplines such as “finance” and “strategy”, marketing compares well, but loses out to "strategy" which takes off some time in the mid-1960s and continues to gain popularity for the rest of the century.


The term “advertising” was more frequent than “marketing” all the way up to the mid-1960s. Marketing pulls ahead in the 1980s.



The term “Madison Avenue” peaks in the mid-1970s. 



 And is eclipsed by the term “silicon valley” after 1979.


Here's a bullish chart showing how "marketing" compares with "stock market".

4 comments:

Charan Bagga said...

Hi Niraj: The spike in 1905 may have had to do with the fact that University of Pennsylvania launched the first marketing course titled: 'The Marketing of products' in 1905.
By the way, this is three years before HBS opened its doors in 1908.
- Charan
(source: wiki; http://people.missouristate.edu/ChuckHermans/Bartels.htm)

Niraj Dawar said...

Thanks Charan -- that explains the increase, but not the sharp corresponding return to norm that immediately follows.

Anonymous said...

Hi,it is possible that the spike is around 1903 when The Ford Motor Company manufactured its first car the Model A? Many changes during this time were brought about through advances in technology.(In correlation with the marketing course Charan described). The turn of the century decade began one of transition and progress and is considered the first decade of materialism and consumerism.By 1906, the Model N was in production but Ford had not yet achieved his goal of producing a simple, affordable car. He would accomplish this with the Model T in 1908. Maybe some marketing was going on with the car and his development of the assembly line that increased the efficiency of manufacture and decreased its cost. As to the immediate drop,not sure.
Source: http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/ford.htm
-college student

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